Conversions

Conversion is a vertical specific term. A click on a landing page might be a conversion for a marketer but nothing sort of case deflection will count as conversion for a support rep. But in SearchUnify,

A conversion is the clicking of a search result. An alternative term for "conversion" is "click through rate." 

The report tracking conversions is Search Conversions in Overview.

Case Deflection

A case deflection means different things to different teams and industries. This article explains case deflection from a support team’s perspective.

For a support manager, a case is said to be deflected if a customer:

  • Searches on the knowledge base, clicks a result, and doesn’t contact support
  • Tries to contact support, finds a helpful articles, and doesn’t log a ticket

The definition can be different for other industries.

Two Stages of Case Deflection

Stage One

Generally organizations keep knowledge bases searchable and open to their customers, so that the customers can help themselves before calling support. In many cases the approach works. Search proves useful and customers find answers and never call support . This is called Stage 1 Deflection, highlighted in blue.

Terminology
  • Total Sessions: Total number of sessions
  • Search Sessions: The sessions in which at least one search was performed.
  • Click Sessions: Search sessions in which at least one result was clicked.
  • No Click Sessions. Search sessions in which no result was clicked.
  • Support Sessions: Sessions in which at least there was at least one visit to the page defined in the Support Page URL.
  • No Search Sessions. Sessions in which a user didn’t run any search.
  • Exit. The number of sessions ended.

Formula for Stage 1 Deflection

Example

In the figure above, there are 106 sessions.

In 42 sessions, a user searches.

In 14 sessions, the user searches and clicks a result

In 4 sessions, the user visits the Support Page after searching and clicking a result.

In 10 sessions, the user doesn’t visit the Support Page after searching and clicking a result.

So according to our formula

It can be rounded off to 24%, which you see in the image above.

Stage Two

In the few scenarios when the customers cannot find help, they usually go to a contact support page to raise a ticket or get in touch with a support agent. On the contact support page, SearchUnify suggests relevant search results when a user starts creating a case. If a customer finds a link and leaves, then this is called Stage 2 Deflection. In the above picture path highlighted in blue is stage 2 deflection.

Related: Enable Stage Two Case Deflection

Terminology
  • Case Creation Sessions. Sessions in which at least one case was logged.

Formula for Stage 2 Deflection

Example In the above figure,

There are 20 Support sessions.

In 4 sessions, users perform a search and click on a result.

In 3 sessions, users leave the Support Page without submitting a case (after searching and clicking a result), as highlighted in the journey. So according to our formula:

Rounding off 42.85% gives us 43%, which is what can be seen in the equation.

Session Tracking Details

It enables an admin to view sessions and the user activity in each session. These sessions are assigned a unique ID (Session Identifier) and arranged in chronological order. The activities monitored are

  • how many searches were performed in a session (Searches)
  • how many clicks were made in a session (Clicks)
  • how many cases were logged in a session (Cases Logged)
  • if a user contacted support (Support Visit)
  • when did a session begin (Start Time)
  • when did a session finish (End Time)

Each activity has its own column which is sortable. As highlighted in Fig. 1, the rows can be sorted by the number of searches; both in their increasing and decreasing order.

Fig. 1

The number of sessions on a popular search client can quickly run into thousands. To make an admin console user’s job easier, SearchUnify provides three navigation tools:

  1. Search Box. Pull up relevant sessions by searching for an email address, session ID, or search query. The dropdown (next image) limits the scope of the search to the selected field. To find sessions in which a particular query was searched, select All Text from the dropdown, enter your query in the search box, and click Enter. Search supports AND and OR operators, both are case sensitive.

  2. Filter By Report. Cut the clutter with the four filters. (1) To view No Search Sessions, check No in Searches. Or, check Yes to exclude No Search Sessions. Ditto with the other filters, which are: (2) Clicks, for which the options are All, Yes (only Click Sessions), and No (only No Click Sessions), (3) Support Visit, for which the options are All, Yes (only the sessions in which support was contacted), and No (only the sessions in which support wasn't contacted), and (4) Cases Logged; for which the options are All, Yes (only those sessions in which a ticket was raised), and No (only those sessions in which a ticket was raised).

  3. All Activities. All Each session ID is clickable. A dialog opens when you click an identifier. In the default state, the dialog contains all user journey metrics, such has search queries and clicks. As an admin, you can customize the details in the dialog by checking the details you need in All Activities. The selection affects report downloads as well, which means that if you have checked only Clicks in All Activities then the downloaded file will have only clicks data.

Besides these 3 filters, there are seven metrics in the report as well. They have been numbered 4 through 10 in the next image.

  1. Session Identifier is a record of user activity. Click it to open a dialog which lists all the tracking activities in Activity Type, a summary of those activities in Activity Detail, and when those activities occurred in Time. The fields in Activity Type can be controlled from All Activities (point 3). Activity Detail varies with activity type. It the activity was a search, then the detail will list the keyword. If the activity was a click, then the detail will have the URL of the clicked page.

  2. Searches records the number of searches made in that particular session.
  3. Clicks records the number of clicks on the produced results.
  4. Cases Logged records any cases that get logged during a session.
  5. Support Visit records if the user visited support during the active session.
  6. Start Time records the time when the session started.
  7. End Time records the time when the session ended.

Email Report button: You can use this to email the report to any email ID.

Download Report button: You can use this to download the report.

Search Filter-Based Clicks

It captures the content sources, content types, and content fields where your customers and employees are looking for answers. In its default state, the report shows the most popular content sources. In Fig. 1, you can spot that Product Documentation is a popular content source because of all the results clicked, 195 are stored on Product Documentation.

Fig. 1

Each row in the Content Sources column can be mapped with the facet category Sources category on your search client.

Fig 2

On clicking a content source, you can discover which content type is most commonly used as a filter. Some content sources store multiple content types, such as Salesforce and Paligo Docs, but others, such as a website, have only one.

In Fig. 3, you can spot multiple content types and in Fig. 4, only one. The content source is on the top left.

NOTE. The sum of Clicks in the second column will be rarely equal to the clicks received by a content source. The reason lies in the different ways the clicks are measured. In the case of content sources, any click on a document hosted on that content source increases the Clicks count. In case of content types, only those clicks are counted in which a Content Type is selected as a filter. The same is true of Content Fields and Content Field values.

Fig. 3

Fig. 4

Further clicking on the content type, shows which content fields are being selected the most. Documentation Type is a commonly selected field (Fig. 5).

Fig. 5

On the search client, Documentation Type will have its own category.

Fig. 6

A click on a content field (Fig. 7) tells you which content field values are being selected the most.

Fig. 7

Developer Guides should be a value in the category (content field) Documentation Type.

Fig. 8

Unsuccessful Case Deflection

Unsuccessful Case Deflection captures the weakest links in your documentation: the articles that were consulted before the customer logged a case and the sessions in which those articles were consulted on main search and the case creation page.

The section on the left (Articles Failed to Deflect Cases) tracks the consulted articles (1), the sessions in which they were consulted (2), and how many clicks each article received (3).

Clicking a number in the Sessions column opens a dialog listing the sessions in which the article was searched. Each row captures three metrics: Session ID, total searches in the session (Searches), and total clicks in the session (Clicks).

To find out how exactly a user journeyed from consulting an article to creating a case, you can click a session ID.

Also, clicking a row in the left section (Articles Failed to Deflect Cases) changes the information in the right section (Searches for Clicked Result), where the Searches column lists the queries that led a user to the clicked article and No. of Searches captures how many times the query was run.

NOTE.

A way to refresh the information in Searches for Clicked Result (right) is to click a row in Clicks (left)

Clicking the title of an article takes you to its webpage.

You can use the dropdown in the left section to filter searches based on their origin: main search (Global), case creation page (Support), or both (All).

Successful Case Deflection

Successful Case Deflection captures the star performers in your documentation: the articles consulted by a user who never logged a ticket.

The section on the left (Articles that Deflected Cases) tracks the consulted articles (1), the sessions in which they were consulted (2), and how many clicks each article received (3).

Clicking a number in the Sessions column opens a dialog listing the sessions in which the article was searched. Each row captures three metrics: Session ID, total searches in the session (Searches), and total clicks in the session (Clicks). The fourth column (Support Visit) is always set to "No."

To discover out how exactly a user journeyed from consulting an article to existing the website (hopefully content with the response), you can click a session ID.

Also, clicking a row in the left section (Articles that Deflected Cases) changes the information in the right section (Searches for Clicked Result), where the Searches column lists the queries that led a user to the clicked article and No. of Searches captures how many times the query was run.

NOTE.

A way to refresh the information in Searches for Clicked Result (right) is to click a row in Clicks (left)

Clicking the title of an article takes you to its webpage.

You can use the dropdown in the left section to filter searches based on their origin: main search (Global), case creation page (Support), or both (All).

Search Summary

Searches with Clicks. List of searched queries which produced results, and at least one of those results is clicked. It shows the number of users, sessions and searches made with the searched queries.

Most Popular Documents

This report lists the most clicked articles with the number of users/sessions/clicks. It maps each clicked article with the keywords that are queried. This tells us about the search keywords for which an article is considered helpful by an end user, on the search results page.

Top Clicked Searches

This report lists the most searched queries with the articles that were clicked. It maps keywords to pages, which page(s) are clicked for a keyword. This tells us about all the pages which were considered helpful for a query searched by an end user, on the search results page.

Attached to Case

This report lists the cases that support Agents attach most frequently in their communication with users. Support Agents get new cases to resolve, and they look for relevant documents, similar cases resolved in the past that would assist them in resolving the new cases faster. Many a times they end up sharing help articles/documents with the users from their support console, using ‘Attach to case’ shortcut option. These are the articles which were found helpful by your agents.

Discussions Ready to Become Help Articles

This report identifies popular discussions and compares the messages in them with the articles in your knowledge base. If a mismatch is found—there are discussions about topics that have not been documented—then it suggests an admin to use that discussion as a draft and convert it into a knowledge base article.

Case Form Page Reports

Articles which were clicked on the Case creation page for search queries, but cases were still logged. It could be inferred that the articles clicked didn’t have relevant content that users were looking for and could have deflected the case. It is advisable to create more documents around these search queries.

Articles which were clicked on the Case creation page for search queries, and cases were not logged. It could be inferred that the articles clicked had relevant content that users were looking for.

Last updatedTuesday, June 23, 2020